Art

Classes

ART 102 : Understanding the Visual Arts

Introduces aesthetic, historical, and critical issues of the visual arts. Presents aspects of drawing, painting, sculpture and craft in terms of experiencing, appreciating and understanding their roles in our lives.

 

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to: 

  • recognize formal qualities in two- and three-dimensional arts and read visual elements, artistic and cultural styles, and symbols
  • view works of art "dynamically," that is, to appreciate and communicate simultaneously individual viewer response, the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later art, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • decipher the visual arts through understanding of historical, social, cultural, economic, and political  contexts
  • generalize course content to other art not covered in the course so that he/she can understand and value the visual arts in all-encompassing global ways

ART 103 : Understanding New Media Arts

Introduces aesthetic, historical, and critical issues of new media arts and design. Presents aspects of printmaking, photography, graphic design, video, film, performance, installation, and other forms of time-based art in terms of experiencing, appreciating and understanding their roles in our lives.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • recognize formal qualities in new media arts and read visual elements, artistic and cultural styles, and symbols
  • view works of art "dynamically," that is, to appreciate and communicate simultaneously individual viewer response, the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later art, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • decipher new media arts and design through understanding of historical, social, cultural, economic, and political contexts
  • generalize course content to other art not covered in the course so that he/she can understand and value new media arts and design in allencompassing global ways

ART 115 : Basic Design - 2D Foundations

Introduces two dimensional black and white foundations studio experience centered on creative problem solving. Develops perceptual awareness and understanding. Establishes critical skills and personal artistic vision. Investigates a broad range of materials, techniques and projects to explore black and white design concepts with reference to historical and contemporary perspectives. Basic Design series 115, 116, and 117 may be taken in any sequence.

Credits

3
  • See and apply design and sources of design with increasing perceptual awareness and understanding in daily living.
  • Create personally significant works of design applying basic design concepts and techniques.
  • Assess, evaluate, appreciate and respect design work.
  • Develop creative solutions to design problems.
  • Handle art materials with environmental awareness and responsibility.

ART 116 : Basic Design - Color Foundations

Introduces color foundations studio experience centered on creative problem solving. Develops perceptual awareness and understanding. Establishes critical skills and personal artistic vision. Investigates a broad range of materials, techniques and projects to explore color design concepts with reference to historical and contemporary perspectives. Basic Design series 115, 116, and 117 may be taken in any sequence.

Credits

3
  • See and apply color, design and sources of color and design with increasing perceptual awareness and understanding in daily living.
  • Create personally significant works of design applying basic design/color concepts and techniques.
  • Assess, evaluate, appreciate and respect design work.
  • Develop creative solutions to color design problems.
  • Handle art materials with environmental awareness and responsibility.

ART 117 : Basic Design -3D Foundations

Explores ways of seeing and creating work that acknowledges personal artistic intentions. Examines various 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D media and processes used to develop and encourage creative problem solving. Establishes critical skills necessary to evaluate art through critiques, discussions, and artistic presentation. Investigates artistic intent, aesthetic and structural solutions, and perceptual awareness. Basic Design series 115, 116, and 117 may be taken in any sequence.

Recommended: an introduction to art, art history or a sense of curiosity and a willingness to experiment.

Credits

3
  • See three-dimensional design and sources of design with perceptual awareness and understanding in daily living.
  • Create personally significant works of design.
  • Assess, evaluate, appreciate and respect design work.
  • Develop creative solutions to three-dimensional design problems.
  • Handle art materials with environmental awareness and responsibility.

ART 131A : Drawing I

Explores basic perceptual drawing techniques and tools as well as the development of the language of drawing in historical and contemporary contexts. Introduces critical skills for sighting, measuring, designing and constructing in drawing. This is the first course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for making drawings.
  • Implement a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about drawing with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and critically evaluate drawings of the past and the present from one’s own and from different cultures to initiate a life long study of the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Employ perceptual and conceptual skills to develop greater sensitivity and awareness of the visual world through drawing.

ART 131B : Drawing I

Introduces intermediate drawing techniques and tools as well as the development of the language of drawing in historical and contemporary contexts. Promotes critical skills for sighting, measuring, designing and constructing in drawing. This is the second course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for making drawings.
  • Implement a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about drawing with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and critically evaluate drawings of the past and the present from one’s own and from different cultures to initiate a life long study of the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Establish perceptual and conceptual skills to develop greater sensitivity and awareness of the visual world through drawing.

ART 131C : Drawing I

Builds upon intermediate drawing techniques and tools as well as the development of the language of drawing in historical and contemporary contexts. Applies critical skills for sighting, measuring, designing and constructing in drawing. This is the third course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Apply creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for making drawings.
  • Implement a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about drawing with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and critically evaluate drawings of the past and the present from one’s own and from different cultures to initiate a life long study of the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Expand perceptual and conceptual skills to develop greater sensitivity and awareness of the visual world through drawing.

ART 181A : Painting I

Explores basic studio painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Introduces a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Through study of the painting discipline students will:

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for expressing visual ideas through the painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate an introductory level of understanding of the painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with creating 2-dimensional imagery with paint.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and develop a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about the painting discipline with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy painting of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a life-long process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of painting.
  • Establish self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through painting while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 181B : Painting I

Introduces intermediate studio painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Promotes a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Through study of the painting discipline students will:

  • Find and continue to develop creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for expressing visual ideas through the painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate an expanding level of understanding of the painting discipline, and the processes and materials,
    and techniques associated with creating 2-dimensional imagery with paint.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and implement a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about the painting discipline with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy painting of the past and the present from different cultures to continue a life-long process of expanding knowledge
    on the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Experience a more heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of painting.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through painting while recognizing the standards and definitions already
    established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 181C : Painting I

Elaborates on intermediate studio painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Promotes a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Through study of the painting discipline students will:

  • Find and continue to develop creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for expressing visual ideas through the painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate an expanding level of understanding of the painting discipline, and the processes and materials,
    and techniques associated with creating 2-dimensional imagery with paint.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and implement a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about the painting discipline with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy painting of the past and the present from different cultures to continue a life-long process of expanding knowledge
    on the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Experience a more heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of painting.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through painting while recognizing the standards and definitions already
    established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 197 : Artist's Skills/Practical Issues

Professional practices relevant to emerging artists' careers. Workshop/lecture format includes resume and portfolio preparation, developing resources and community, gaining exposure and representation for artwork, creating publicity, basic marketing and exhibition strategies, presenting and installing art work, business concerns, art market dynamics, art collecting.

Credits

3

Students will:

  • Participate in studio work sessions, field trips, class discussions, presentations, and critiques.
  • Develop personal and/or professional mission statement.
  • Compose professional artist resume.
  • Compose professional artist's statement.
  • Create and present (visual) document/portfolio of artwork with slides, PowerPoint presentation, web site, video, show or alternative methods.
  • Compile, organize, assess and employ ongoing records of professional artist resources, skills, community, and business.
  • Define, apply and document 10-20 hours of practical, art-related skills in the community through a Service Learning project, through internships in an arts related field or through personally defined projects.

ART 204 : History of Western Art

Examines visual art and architecture as a reflection of human interaction with the socio-political and physical environment of a particular era. Focuses on viewing, analyzing and comparing many art forms in an historical context, and covers the Paleolithic, Ancient Near Eastern, and Aegean cultures, beginning about 30,000 BCE.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

The student will:

  • Appreciate art and architecture in general, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement
  • View works of art "dynamically:" that is, comprehend the uniqueness of a work, its origins and context within a specific cultural milieu, while also appreciating its potential influence on later art and artists
  • Understand and value the art and architecture of the ancient world in all-encompassing ways  and recognize the persisting influence of its styles and concepts on our current cultural environment

ART 205 : History of Western Art

Examines visual art and architecture as a reflection of human interaction with the socio-political and physical environment. Focuses on viewing, analyzing and comparing many art forms in an historical context, and covers Late Antiquity, Early Christian and Medieval periods, beginning about 500 BCE.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate art and architecture in general, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement
  • Explore the development of styles and subject matter during the transition from the ancient world to modern times by placing individual works within a cultural and historical context while also making connections between earlier and later eras
  • Understand and value art and architecture from the Ancient Roman world through the Gothic era and recognize the persisting influence of its styles and concepts on our current cultural environment

ART 206 : History of Western Art

Examines visual art and architecture as a reflection of human interaction with the socio-political and physical environment. Focuses on viewing, analyzing and comparing many art forms in an historical context, and covers the Renaissance and Baroque periods, beginning about 1300 CE.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate art and architecture in general, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement
  • Recognize the ways in which the forms and ideas of Renaissance and Baroque art and architecture reflect and were shaped by their historical and cultural context
  • Understand and value Renaissance and Baroque cultures in all-encompassing ways and recognize their persisting influence on our current cultural environment

ART 207 : History of Asian Art (India)

Explores and analyzes the visual arts in relation to the culture of India from the Neolithic through the modern period.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the art and architecture of India from the Neolithic through the modern period, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement
  • View works of art "dynamically," that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later art, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • Understand and value art and architecture from India in all-encompassing ways and recognize the persisting influence of its styles and concepts on our current cultural environment

ART 208 : History of Asian Art (China)

Explores and analyzes the visual arts in relation to the culture of China from the Neolithic through the modern period.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the art and architecture of China from the Neolithic through the modern period, and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement
  • View works of art "dynamically," that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later art, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • Articulate the relationship between art from China and work produced by other cultures to understand and value art and architecture in all-encompassing ways, in this country and abroad

ART 209 : History of Asian Art (Japan)

Explores and analyzes the visual arts in relation to the culture of Japan from the Neolithic through the modern period.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Appreciate the art and architecture of Japan from the Neolithic through the modern period and enjoy a life enriched by the exposure to and the understanding of personal and cultural achievement
  • View works of art "dynamically," that is, to appreciate simultaneously the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later art, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • Articulate the relationship between art from Japan and work produced by other cultures to understand and value art and architecture in all-encompassing ways, in this country and abroad

ART 210 : Women in Art

Covers the work of women artists from antiquity to the present. Examines works of the most important women artists from each period in relation to the changing roles of women in society and to the canon of art history.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • recognize formal qualities in art and read visual elements, artistic and cultural styles, and symbols
  • view works of art "dynamically," that is, to appreciate and communicate simultaneously individual viewer response, the uniqueness of a work, its origins and precedent, its potential as an inspiration and influence on later art, and its relationship to a particular cultural moment
  • decipher content and meaning of works made by women artists through understanding of historical, social, cultural, economic, and political contexts
  • use an understanding of feminist critique in art work and in the history of art to apply theoretical  approaches of gender, race, and class to works of art made by women
  • adapt theoretical approaches and course content to other art not covered in the course so that he/she can understand and value art made by women in all-encompassing global ways

 

ART 213 : Modern Art History - Art Since 1945

Focuses attention on American art, as World War II ended the supremacy of Europe in the visual art world. Analyzes art since 1945 to explore the ideas behind it, to reveal our culture and values and to gain a greater understanding of contemporary art with its global perspective.

Credits

4

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Develop an understanding of the cultural and political developments mirrored in modern and contemporary visual art forms
  • View art of our times “dynamically:” that is, comprehend the uniqueness of a work, its origins and context within a specific cultural milieu, while also appreciating its relationship to art of the past
  • Understand the effects of globalization and new media on how art is conceived and received in the modern era
  • Recognize formal qualities in contemporary art and read visual elements, artistic and cultural styles, and symbols

ART 217 : Comics Art & Literature

Examines comics art as a medium of visual narrative. Analyzes aesthetic qualities unique to comic books and graphic novels in artistic, historical, and literary contexts using seminal texts.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Equivalent placement test scores also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Use creative ways to appreciate comics art as an artistic and literary practice through exploration of the art form’s diversity and narrative potential.
  • Increase one’s understanding of word/image relationships and visual communication.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and use a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about comics art with others.
  • Understand and interpret relationships between comics and commercialism.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of understanding comics art.
  • Practice self-critiquing skills to increase autonomous expression through comics art while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and istorical works of art from different cultures.

ART 231A : Drawing II

Deepens basic perceptual drawing techniques and tools as well as the understanding of the language of drawing in historical and contemporary contexts. Further develops critical skills for sighting, measuring, designing and constructing in drawing. This is the first course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Implement deeper creative strategies to solve problems in making drawings.
  • Implement a developed vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about drawing with others.
  • Manifest autonomous expression through drawing while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Employ perceptual and conceptual skills to develop a richer experience of the visual world.

ART 231B : Drawing II

Further deepens basic perceptual drawing techniques and tools as well as the understanding of the language of drawing in historical and contemporary contexts. Further develops critical skills for sighting, measuring, designing and constructing in drawing. This is the second course in a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Implement deeper creative strategies to solve problems in making drawings.
  • Implement a developed vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about drawing with others.
  • Manifest autonomous expression through drawing while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Advance perceptual and conceptual skills to develop a richer experience of the visual world.

ART 231C : Drawing II

Further deepens intermediate perceptual drawing techniques and tools as well as the understanding of the language of drawing in historical and contemporary contexts. Further develops critical skills for sighting, measuring, designing and constructing in drawing. This is the third course in a three-course sequence

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Implement deeper creative strategies to solve problems in making drawings.
  • Implement a developed vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about drawing with others
  • Manifest autonomous expression through drawing while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Refine perceptual and conceptual skills to develop a richer experience of the visual world.

ART 237A : Life Drawing

Investigates drawing the human form through referencing professional models and applying various drawing processes and concepts. Develops understanding of the structure, form and proportions of the human figure in the context of composition, personal expression and an awareness of materials.

Credits

3
  • Implement creative ways to solve visualization problems in drawing the human form using a variety of perceptual and conceptual strategies.
  • Apply an introductory level of understanding of the proportions of the human figure and the relation of the figure to the compositional space through the processes, materials, and techniques associated with drawing.
  • Participate with others in a critical dialogue about figure drawings from the past, the present, and from other cultures.
  • Actualize personal expression and self-critical skills in figure drawing while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Experience a heightened awareness of the physical world and the nature of the relationship of human beings to it via the experience of figure drawing

ART 237B : Life Drawing

Further investigates drawing the human form through referencing professional models and applying various drawing processes and concepts. Develops understanding of the structure, form and proportions of the human figure in the context of composition, personal expression and an awareness of materials.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Further implement creative ways to solve visualization problems in drawing the human form using a variety of perceptual and conceptual strategies.
  • Apply an intermediate level of understanding of the proportions of the human figure and the relation of the figure to the compositional space through the processes, materials, and techniques associated with drawing.
  • Participate with others in a critical dialogue about figure drawings from the past, the present, and from other cultures.
  • Actualize personal expression and self-critical skills in figure drawing while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Experience a heightened awareness of the physical world and the nature of the relationship of human beings to it via the experience of figure drawing.

ART 237C : Life Drawing

Further investigates drawing the human form through referencing professional models and applying various drawing processes and concepts. Develops intermediate understanding of the structure, form and proportions of the human figure in the context of composition, personal expression and an awareness of materials.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Further implement creative ways to solve visualization problems in drawing the human form using a variety of perceptual and conceptual strategies.
  • Apply an expanded intermediate level of understanding of the proportions of the human figure and the relation of the figure to the compositional space through the processes, materials, and techniques associated with drawing.
  • Participate with others in a critical dialogue about figure drawings from the past, the present, and from other cultures.
  • Refine personal expression and self-critical skills in figure drawing while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Experience a heightened awareness of the physical world and the nature of the relationship of human beings to it via the experience of figure drawing.

ART 253A : Ceramics I

Introduces beginning ceramic processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develop a beginning level of creative problem solving and kinetic skills with clay forming and finishing techniques, including hand building, wheel throwing, use of plaster molds, and surface treatments. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate ceramic works, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. This is the first course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Students will endeavor to do the following:

  • Find and develop beginning level creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for making ceramics.
  • Creates personal works in clay, which demonstrate a beginning level of understanding of ceramic ideas, materials and techniques.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and develop a beginning level vocabulary to actively participate in a critical dialogue about ceramics with others.
  • Experience and appreciate ceramics of the past and the present from different cultures in order to initiate a life- long process of expanding one’s knowledge of the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Develop, through the experience of making and studying ceramics, an awareness of the relationship of human beings to the physical world, and our positive and negative impact.
  • Establish self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression in ceramics while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 253B : Ceramics I

Introduces beginning intermediate level ceramic processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develop a beginning intermediate level of creative problem solving and kinetic skills with clayforming and finishing techniques, including hand building, wheel throwing, use of plaster molds, and surface treatments. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate ceramic works, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. This is the second course of a three-course sequence for first year ceramics.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Explore and develop beginning intermediate level creative ways to solve ceramic process problems using a variety of strategies for making ceramics.
  • Create personal works in clay, which demonstrate a beginning level of understanding of ceramic ideas, materials and techniques.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about ceramics with others using beginning intermediate level vocabulary.
  • Evaluate and appreciate ceramics of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via and experience of making and studying ceramics.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression in ceramics while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 253C : Ceramics I

Introduces intermediate level ceramic processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develop an intermediate level of creative problem solving and kinetic skills with clay forming and finishing techniques, including hand building, wheel throwing, use of plaster molds, and surface treatments. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to exercise critical skills necessary to evaluate ceramic works, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. Employs creative problem solving through implementing a variety of strategies. This is the third course of a three-course sequence for first year ceramics.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Research and develop intermediate level creative ways to solve ceramic process problems using a variety of strategies for making ceramics.
  • Create personal ceramic artwork, which demonstrates an intermediate level of ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with hand building and wheel throwing processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about ceramics with others using intermediate level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate ceramics of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Develop, through the experience of making and studying ceramics, an awareness of the relationship of human beings to the physical world, and our positive and negative impact.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to demonstrate autonomous expression in ceramics, while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 256A : Ceramics II

Introduces lower-advanced level ceramics processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develop a lower-advanced level of creative problem solving and kinetic skills with clay forming and finishing techniques, including hand building, wheel throwing, use of plaster molds, and surface treatments. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate ceramic works, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions and expand perceptual awareness. This is the first course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Research and develop lower-advanced level creative ways to solve ceramic process problems using a variety of strategies for making ceramics.
  • Create personal ceramic artwork, which demonstrates a lower-advanced level of ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with hand building and wheel throwing processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about ceramics with others using intermediate level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate ceramics of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Develop, through the experience of making and studying ceramics, an awareness of the relationship of human beings to the physical world, and our positive and negative impact.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to demonstrate autonomous expression in ceramics, while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 256B : Ceramics II

Introduces middle-advanced level ceramics processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develop a middle-advanced level of creative problem solving and kinetic skills with clay forming and finishing techniques, including hand building, wheel throwing, use of plaster molds, and surface treatments. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate ceramic works, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions and expand perceptual awareness. This is the second course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Research and develop middle-advanced level creative ways to solve ceramic process problems using a variety of strategies for making ceramics.
  • Create personal ceramic artwork, which demonstrates a middle advanced level of ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with hand building and wheel throwing processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about ceramics with others using middle-advanced level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate ceramics of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Develop, through the experience of making and studying ceramics, an awareness of the relationship of human beings to the physical world, and our positive and negative impact.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to demonstrate autonomous expression in ceramics, while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Develop a somewhat cohesive body of artwork that is presentable to galleries, school programs, art organizations and to professional artists.

ART 256C : Ceramics II

Introduces advanced level ceramics processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develop an advanced level of creative problem solving and kinetic skills with clay forming and finishing techniques, including hand building, wheel throwing, use of plaster molds, and surface treatments. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate ceramic works, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions and expand perceptual awareness. This is the third course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Research and develop advanced level creative ways to solve ceramic process problems using a variety of strategies for making ceramics.
  • Create personal ceramic artwork, which demonstrates an advanced level of ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with hand building and wheel throwing processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about ceramics with others using advanced level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate ceramics of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Develop, through the experience of making and studying ceramics, an awareness of the relationship of human beings to the physical world, and our positive and negative impact.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to demonstrate autonomous expression in ceramics, while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Develop a reasonably cohesive body of artwork that is presentable to galleries, school programs, art organizations and to professional artists.

ART 270A : Printmaking I

Introduces basic printmaking processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develops an introductory level of creative problem solving and terminology of monoprints, relief and basic intaglio processes. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate prints, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. This is the first course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Students will endeavor to do the following:

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for making prints by utilizing monoprints, relief and basic intaglio processes.
  • Create personal hand-printed artwork, which demonstrate an introductory level of understanding printmaking ideas, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with monoprints, relief and basic intaglio processes in printmaking.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and develop a basic vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about printmaking with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy prints of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of making prints.
  • Establish self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through printmaking while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 270B : Printmaking I

Introduces intermediate beginning printmaking processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Includes terminology of monoprints, relief and some intermediate intaglio processes. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate prints, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. Promotes creative problem solving by employing a variety of strategies. This is the second course of a three-course sequence for first year printmaking.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve printmaking problems using a variety of strategies for intermediate begining monoprints, relief and intaglio
    processes.
  • Create personal hand-printed artwork, which demonstrates an intermediate beginners level of printmaking ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with monoprints, relief and basic intaglio processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about printmaking with others using intermediate beginning level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy prints of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on
    the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of making prints.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through printmaking while recognizing the standards and definitions already
    established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 270C : Printmaking I

Explores intermediate printmaking processes, techniques, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Includes terminology of monoprints, relief and intermediate intaglio processes. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to exercise critical skills necessary to evaluate prints, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. Employs creative problem solving through implementing a variety of strategies. This is the third course of a three-course sequence for first year printmaking.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Students will be able to:

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve printmaking problems using a variety of strategies for intermediate monoprints, relief and intaglio processes.
  • Create personal hand-printed artwork, which demonstrates an intermediate level of printmaking ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with monoprints, relief and intaglio processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about printmaking with others using intermediate level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy prints of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of making prints.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to demonstrate autonomous expression through printmaking while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 271A : Printmaking II

Introduces beginning advanced printmaking techniques (e.g. sugar lift, color, glazes) and other intaglio processes (e.g. folio sets and books) while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Develops creative problem solving by utilizing monotypes, color relief, and advanced intaglio processes to create a print. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate prints, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness. This is the first course of a three-course sequence.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve problems using a variety of strategies for making prints by utilizing beginning advanced monotypes, relief and intaglio and printmaking processes (e.g. sugar lift,color, chine colle, glazes).
  • Create personal hand-printed artwork (e.g. folio sets, fine art books, and limited editioned prints), which demonstrate an understanding of a beginning advanced level of printmaking ideas, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with monotypes, relief and advanced intaglio and printmaking processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and develop a beginning advanced vocabulary to be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about printmaking with others.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy prints of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Establish self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through printmaking while recognizing the standards and definitions already established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.
  • Understand the importance of working in a communal environment/studio.

ART 271B : Printmaking II

Explores intermediate advanced printmaking techniques (e.g. sugar lift, color, glazes) and complete a variety of projects (e.g. folio sets and books) while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate prints, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve printmaking problems using a variety of strategies for intermediate advanced monoprints, relief and
    intaglio processes.
  • Create personal hand-printed artwork, which demonstrates an intermediate advanced level of printmaking ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with monoprints, relief and basic intaglio processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about printmaking with others using
    intermediate advanced level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy prints of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on
    the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of making prints.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through printmaking while recognizing the standards and definitions already
    established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 271C : Printmaking II

Further explores advanced printmaking techniques (e.g. sugar lift, color, glazes) and complete a variety of projects (e.g. folio sets and books) while addressing historical and contemporary issues. Includes critiques, discussions, and presentations to establish critical skills necessary to evaluate prints, explore artistic intent, examine aesthetic and structural solutions, and expand perceptual awareness.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Find and develop creative ways to solve printmaking problems using a variety of strategies for advanced monoprints, relief and intaglio processes.
  • Create personal hand-printed artwork, which demonstrates an advanced level of printmaking ideas, processes, materials, and techniques associated with monoprints, relief and basic intaglio processes.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify ideas and issues, and be able to actively participate in a critical dialogue about printmaking with others using
    advanced level vocabulary.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy prints of the past and the present from different cultures to initiate a lifelong process of expanding knowledge on
    the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Develop a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of making prints.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills to develop autonomous expression through printmaking while recognizing the standards and definitions already
    established by both contemporary and historical works of art from different cultures.

ART 277A : Life Painting

Examines the human form through the study and painting of live professional models. Applies various painting techniques and concepts as students learn the structure, form and proportions of the human figure. Emphasizes personal artistic development with attention to compositional organization.

Credits

3

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Solve basic problems creatively using a variety of acquired strategies for expressing visual ideas through the figure painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a basic understanding of the figure painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an basic art vocabulary in critical dialogue about the figure painting discipline.
  • Appreciate figure painting from different cultures, facilitating a life-long engagement with the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Enjoy a basic awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of figure painting.
  • Acquire self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through figure painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 277B : Life Painting

Examines the human form through the study and painting of live professional models. Applies various painting techniques and concepts as students learn the structure, form and proportions of the human figure. Emphasizes personal artistic development with attention to compositional organization.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Solve more complex problems creatively using a variety of acquired strategies for expressing visual ideas through the figure painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate an expanded understanding of the figure painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an intermediate level art vocabulary in critical dialogue about the figure painting discipline.
  • Understand and appreciate figure painting from different cultures, facilitating a life-long engagement with the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Enjoy a growing awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of figure painting.
  • Employ self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through figure painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 277C : Life Painting

Examines the human form through the study and painting of live professional models. Applies more advanced painting techniques and concepts as students learn the structure, form and proportions of the human figure. Emphasizes personal artistic development with attention to compositional organization and conceptual framework.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Master complex problems creatively using a variety of acquired strategies for expressing visual ideas through the figure painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a thorough understanding of the figure painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ a knowledgeable art vocabulary in critical dialogue about the figure painting discipline.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate figure painting from different cultures, facilitating a life-long engagement with the diversity of perspectives of the human experience.
  • Enjoy a strong awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of figure painting.
  • Expand self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through figure painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 279A : Experimental Media

Begins ways of seeing and creating work that acknowledges personal artistic intentions. Examines various 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D media and processes used to develop and encourage creative problem solving. Establishes critical skills necessary to evaluate art through critiques, discussions, and artistic presentation. Investigates artistic intent, aesthetic and structural solutions, and perceptual awareness.

Recommended: an introduction to art, art history or a sense of curiosity and a willingness to experiment.

Credits

3
  • Adapt introductory level understanding of ideas, materials, and techniques associated with the nature of experimental media beyond traditional media.
  • Use a basic vocabulary of art that actively participates with others in critical dialogue about 2-D, 3-D and 4-D experimental media and processes.
  • Interpret and enjoy experimental art from the past, present and from different cultures to understand diverse perspectives of the human experience.
  • Apply the experience of using experimental art to heightened awareness of the needs of our physical world, the nature of human relationships and our impact on an ever changing world.
  • Identify self-critiquing skills for autonomous artistic expression through experimental media and processes while recognizing the standards already established in the art world.

ART 279B : Experimental Media

Expands intermediate ways of seeing and creating work that acknowledges personal artistic intentions. Examines various 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D media and processes used to develop and encourage creative problem solving. Establishes critical skills necessary to evaluate art through critiques, discussions, and artistic presentation. Develops artistic intent, aesthetic and structural solutions, and perceptual awareness.

Recommended: an introduction to art, art history or a sense of curiosity and a willingness to experiment.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Develop intermediate level understanding of ideas, materials, and techniques associated with the nature of experimental media beyond traditional media.
  • Use expanded vocabulary of art that actively participates with others in critical dialogue about 2-D, 3-D and 4-D experimental media and processes.
  • Interpret and enjoy experimental art from the past, present and from different cultures to understand diverse perspectives of the human experience.
  • Build upon the experience of using experimental art to heightened awareness of the needs of our physical world, the nature of human relationships and our impact on an ever-changing world.
  • Develop self-critiquing skills for autonomous artistic expression through experimental media and processes while recognizing the standards already established in the art world.

ART 279C : Experimental Media

Advances ways of seeing and creating work that acknowledges personal artistic intentions. Examines various 2-D, 3-D, and 4-D media and processes used to develop and encourage creative problem solving. Establishes critical skills necessary to evaluate art through critiques, discussions, and artistic presentation. Employs artistic intent, aesthetic and structural solutions, and perceptual awareness.

Recommended: an introduction to art, art history or a sense of curiosity and a willingness to experiment.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Develop advanced level understanding of ideas, materials, and techniques associated with the nature of experimental media beyond traditional media.
  • Use vocabulary of art that actively participates with others in critical dialogue about 2-D, 3-D and 4-D experimental media and processes.
  • Interpret and enjoy experimental art from the past, present and from different cultures to understand diverse perspectives of the human experience.
  • Implement the experience of using experimental art to heightened awareness of the needs of our physical world, the nature of human relationships and our impact on an ever-changing world.
  • Evaluate self-critiquing skills for autonomous artistic expression through experimental media and processes while recognizing the standards already established in the art world.

ART 281A : Painting II

Explores ways of seeing and elaborates on intermediate painting techniques, materials, and concepts while relating to historical and contemporary issues. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Solve increasingly complex aesthetic problems creatively, using strategies for expressing visual ideas through the painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of the painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanded vocabulary in critical dialogue about the painting discipline.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate painting from different cultures, facilitating increased engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a more sophisticated awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of painting.
  • Implement increased self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 281B : Painting II

Explores ways of seeing and elaborates on intermediate painting techniques, materials, and concepts while relating to historical and contemporary issues. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Solve increasingly complex aesthetic problems creatively, using complex strategies for expressing visual ideas through the painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a strong understanding of the painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanded vocabulary in critical dialogue about the painting discipline.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate painting from different cultures, facilitating increased engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a more sophisticated awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of painting.
  • Implement advanced self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 281C : Painting II

Expands ways of seeing and elaborates on intermediate painting techniques, materials, and concepts while relating to historical and contemporary issues. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Master increasingly complex aesthetic problems creatively, using complex strategies for expressing visual ideas through the painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a thorough understanding of the painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expansive vocabulary in critical dialogue about the painting discipline.
  • Understand, interpret, and appreciate painting from different cultures, facilitating increased engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a sophisticated awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of painting.
  • Implement proficient self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 284A : Water Media I

Explores basic studio watercolor painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues to increase visual literacy. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3
  • Learn to solve problems creatively using a variety of acquired strategies for expressing visual ideas through the watercolor painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a basic understanding of the watercolor painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ a basic watercolor painting vocabulary in critical dialogue about the watercolor painting discipline.
  • Begin to understand, interpret, and appreciate watercolor painting from different cultures,facilitating a life-long engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of watercolor painting.
  • Implement self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through watercolor painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 284B : Water Media I

Expands studio watercolor painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues to increase visual literacy. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

  • Develop solve problems creatively using a variety of acquired strategies for expressing visual ideas through the watercolor painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a basic understanding of the watercolor painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Expand meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ a basic watercolor painting vocabulary in critical dialogue about the watercolor painting discipline.
  • Begin to understand, interpret, and appreciate watercolor painting from different cultures,facilitating a life-long engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of watercolor painting.
  • Implement self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through watercolor painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 284C : Water Media I

Implements advanced studio watercolor painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues to increase visual literacy. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with basic art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

  • Further understanding to solve problems creatively using a variety of acquired strategies for expressing visual ideas through the watercolor painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a basic understanding of the watercolor painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Employs meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ a basic watercolor painting vocabulary in critical dialogue about the watercolor painting discipline.
  • Begin to understand, interpret, and appreciate watercolor painting from different cultures,facilitating a life-long engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a heightened awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of watercolor painting.
  • Implement self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through watercolor painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 287A : Water Media II

Explores intermediate and more advanced studio watercolor painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues to increase visual literacy. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with advanced art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

  • Solve more complex problems using additional strategies for expressing visual ideas through the Water Media painting medium.
  • Create advanced personal works of art, which demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of the watercolor painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with Water Media.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanding Water Media painting vocabulary in critical dialogue about the Water Media painting discipline.
  • Understand, interpret, and enjoy water media painting from different cultures facilitating increased engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a more sophisticated awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of Water Media painting.
  • Implement expanded self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through Water Media painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 287B : Water Media II

Explores intermediate and more advanced studio watercolor painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues to increase visual literacy. Presents a conceptual framework for critical analysis along with advanced art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion, students should be able to:

  • Solve more complex problems using additional strategies for expressing visual ideas through the Water Media painting medium.
  • Create advanced personal works of art, which demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of the Water Media painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanding watercolor painting vocabulary in critical dialogue about the Water Media painting discipline.
  • Utilize, interpret, and enjoy Water Media painting from different cultures facilitating increased engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a more sophisticated awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the experience of Water Media painting.
  • Implement expanded self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through Water Media painting with respect to the standards established in contemporary and historical works of art.

ART 287C : Water Media II

Explores intermediate and more advanced studio Water Media painting techniques, materials, and concepts while addressing historical and contemporary issues to increase visual literacy. Presents a further understood conceptual framework for critical analysis along with advanced art theory.

Credits

3

Prerequisites

Instructor permission also accepted.

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Solve more complex problems using additional strategies for expressing visual ideas through the watercolor painting medium.
  • Create personal works of art, which demonstrate a strong understanding of the painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.Create advanced personal works of art, which demonstrate an intermediate knowledge of the watercolor painting discipline, and the processes, materials, and techniques associated with it.
  • Ask meaningful questions, identify topical issues, and employ an expanded water color painting vocabulary in critical dialogue about the watercolor painting discipline.
  • Employ understand, interpret, and enjoy watercolor painting from different cultures facilitating increased engagement with the diversity of perspectives in the human experience.
  • Enjoy a more sophisticated awareness of the physical world, the nature of the relationship of human beings to it, and our impact on it via the
    experience of watercolor painting.
  • Implement expanded self-critiquing skills en route to autonomous expression through watercolor painting with respect to the standards
    established in contemporary and historical works of art.